Skip to content

LinkedIn
YouTube
RSS

Take 10@10 for a toolbox talk about safety in your workplace. Take the opportunity to share information about the work your team does and how it's done with positive conversations that grow safety.

A toolbox talk can be a short presentation about a health and safety matter or a regular meeting with an agenda.

Making a toolbox talk effective

Relevant

  • Talk with your workers about the issues that are most relevant to them.
  • You may be able to kick-off a discussion with a news item that is relevant to your work e.g. an incident or injury in your line of work.

Site-specific

  • Talk about current or coming-soon activities in your workplace.

Thought provoking

  • Use questions and answers such as:
    • posing a safety problem related to the work you all do; or
    • storytelling- telling about how a problem's been solved - this makes the problem real for people and helps them better understand risks and hazards.

Practical

  • Describe the problem and how together you can reduce the risk of injury. If everyone knows exactly what to do and believes it will work, you're all more likely to take positive action.

It's also a good idea to think about:

The fact that most people underestimate the risks they take on the job each day. Use examples that clarify the risks inherent in the work you do each day.

Using tools that demonstrate key points works well in toolbox talks.

Encourage your team to think through a situation/problem and identify what is actually causing it (such as poor supervision, being rushed, short-staffed).

Ask experienced workers to talk to the group drawing on their knowledge.

Some people learn better from written information. If you provide handouts make sure they're short, written in simple, clear language and give specific actions for people to do to prevent an incident, injury or illness.

If you are outdoors or in a noisy environment, check that everyone can clearly hear and see you.

If you have a team with different language needs cater for it so that everyone understands what's being said.

At the end of each toolbox talk, it is a good idea summarise what's been discussed. End the session with questions and answers to make sure everyone has a chance to contribute.

Here are some topics for your next toolbox talk:

Choose from these listed topics, which come with session notes, presenter notes (PDF 212kb) and a poster (PDF 203kb) to promote your session/s.

Our series of Let's Talk Safety posters on four key topics also help you and your Take 10@10 presentation.